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5 Steps for Designing a Breezeway

There are several factors that you will want to consider in designing a breezeway for your home. A breezeway is a structure that usually connects the house with an outside building such as a garage. These spaces offer appeal for a variety of reasons, from the basic need of keeping the elements off to expanding the existing living space. Here you will find some of the most common considerations when planning for such a structure.

Structural Design

A breezeway can be either an enclosed space or designed as an open breezeway. An enclosed breezeway will have walls and a roof between the structures, whereas an open design usually consists of just a roof with supports. Climate is a large factor when considering which to build. If you live in the sunny and warm southwest you may want to consider an open design, whereas if you live in the northern part of the country you may want an enclosed structure to keep the elements out.

Function

Functionality is also a factor when debating between an open or enclosed design. An open design can double as a covered porch or be turned into an outdoor living area with comfortable furniture and soothing fountains. An enclosed breezeway can provide a space for muddy boots and wet coats and hats to be left before entering the home. Space can be further utilized with an enclosed breezeway by the addition of a powder room or pantry to the mud room.

Architectural Design

The architectural design of the breezeway should complement the existing structures. There are plenty of resources for you to design your own breezeway, but if your home has a very particular design or a custom design, you may want to consult an architect for the building plans. The original architect can also draw up plans that even if not originally intended, can incorporate the new breezeway into the existing design.

Plumbing and Electricity

You will certainly want to keep in mind fixtures that will need electric or water supplies in designing the breezeway. Keep in mind, you will at least want some lighting to illuminate the area. You may also want to add some water supplies if you will eventually add a powder room, or even just to have a place to water plants or animals. Plan for anything that you think you may want to do with the space, even if it is down the road several years. By having electric, heat and plumbing planned out in advance, any future plans will be that much smoother. You will be glad of your foresight when that time comes.

Decor

A breezeway can be both a functional as well as an aesthetically appealing space. Many interior designers capitalize on the transition from the two structures, and frequently focus on the space to be one of relaxation and enjoyment. Themes for decor are endless, from a tropical rain forest escape to a Zen garden. The decor of the space, regardless of how functional or even mundane, will help to incorporate it as an extension of the home.

Article from topics: Steps for Designing a Breezeway

2010